Making Your Home Business and Education Experience

As a staff writer at ‘Home Based Business’ we regularly answer questions submitted by our members, one great topic is using personal experience to make money.

Education is in high demand these days. High schools are teaching more difficult subjects, colleges have become more intense in their material, and graduate schools are strict on whom they accept into their programs. Institutions are looking for the best of the best, and with education the key to getting ahead in the world and being happy and successful, parents all over are striving to give their kids every edge possible.

Before you start buying supplies and advertising your services as a tutor, be sure to check up on all rules and regulations your state may have regarding tutor entrepreneurs. There may also be local and regional regulations you will have to follow. As with any business, research, research, research, before you make any solid decisions. You never want to start your business and realize you may have missed out on something.

After you have all the information, you can get started. Much of what you first decide upon will concern your monetary assets; where to allocate them, how much to use, etc. Here are a few tips when it comes to organizing your new tutoring business.

*Map out policies. Determine your prices and make a clear, concise outline of how much you will ask for and how long your tutoring periods are. Also, create certain times you will allow students to have make-up sessions in the case that someone misses a tutoring session. Both parents and students need to be aware of your policies so there is less of a chance of any confusion should times or payment not be met. A good idea is to get your payment before the week (or the tutoring period you decide on) starts. This will help lessen absences and cause less frustration to you when people do suddenly cancel.

*Go local first. See if your community has any specific regulations you should follow when it comes to tutoring. Different communities may be looking for different things or look at tutoring in a certain light. You can also provide your tutoring service directly to schools, but make sure you know what they expect from you, as well as what the parents expect.

*Bring your services right to parents. Pick out good places to advertise your services and start doing so. Many libraries have boards where you can post fliers or advertise in other local publications you are sure parents will look at. You can also network with schools. If you are working with the school, they can refer you to parents seeking tutoring for their children, or if you are your own separate business, you can ask that they pass information along concerning your services.

*Put a hold on teaching material. The best idea is to wait until after your first few tutoring sessions (as well as payments) before you go out and splurge on tutoring material. Each student will be learning something different, depending upon your choice of age range and subject range, and buying up a lot of supplies can become very expensive very quickly. Initially your computer will be your best tool. With internet access you can find free teaching materials or if you need, lesson plans. You may even be able to find material at your library. There are also cheap materials you can buy online if you need, so hold off on bigger items until you are sure you will need them, such as textbooks, workbooks, and other large purchases.

*Watch your cash flow. If you have teamed up with a school or two and have settled in on getting paid through their payroll instead of directly through parents, be sure you can manage your money effectively. There are some schools that have a 90-day pay delay, so if you are expecting your paycheck soon, you may be in for a longer wait than you thought. Be sure to have enough cash on hand until your next check.

Building a tutoring business can be difficult, but it can also be rewarding. Knowing you are helping children succeed in school and feeling more comfortable about subjects they were previously struggling in can be gratifying. If you want to open a business that helps children and provides you with a sense of accomplishment as well, then a tutoring business may be a worthwhile venture.